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Cloudy

Photograph of a cloudy coastline

A gloomy day in the Andaman and Nicobar Islands transforms the sea and sky from their typical vibrant blue colour to a dreary grey.

(Submitted to the Daily Post’s Weekly Photo Challenge: “Serene“)

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Sunrise

Photograph of Sunrise

Photograph of Sunrise

Beaches, such as this one in the Andaman and Nicobar Islands of India, are probably the best places to experience a sunrise or sunset, with the horizon completely free of obstructions and the sun’s rays reflecting off the ocean.

(Submitted to the Daily Post’s Weekly Challenges: “Serene“, “Temporary“, “Delta“)

Flow

Photograph of a river

Photograph of a river

Fast flowing rivers such as the one in the photograph are massively powerful. They can get through almost any obstacle, carve out whole valleys and alter entire landscapes. Millions of litres of water flow at breakneck speeds through the river valley, racing to get to the plains as quickly as they can. Almost no fish can live in this part of the river – the current is simply too strong. The power and weight of the river is an inspiring reminder of the Forces of Nature

The river in the photograph is the River Kosi, in the Himalayan foothills. The river passes near the famous Jim Corbett National Park, and is an important geographical feature of the area. It flows pretty fast in this area, and this is evident from the large, rounded boulders on the river backs. Besides being important to the nearby landscape and wildlife, it is also important to the people living in the area. It generates a lot of income through tourism, fishing, hydroelectricity, etcetera. Though not as large or popular as the Ganga or Yamuna, it is nevertheless a spectacle of the scale of nature.

This photograph was actually taken on the way to the actual destination, which was Jim Corbett National Park. Often, the journey can be as good, if not better, than the actual destination.

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Water – Part 2

Photograph of Water

Photograph of Water

The shapes created by these drops while falling from the tap are truly remarkable. If you look closely and get creative, the drop at the very bottom looks like a hollowed out bowl and the drop at the very top looks like a mushroom. Also, in the second and third drops from the bottom, the text behind the drops is visible.

Just think, these sort of structures are created every time anyone turns on a tap! Unfortunately, they last for such a small time that they are almost impossible to observe with the naked eye. A camera, preferably with a flash and very high shutter speed, is needed to fully admire these beautiful structures. Even then, a matter of a few hundredths of a second can make all the difference between a perfect and a terrible photograph.

(Entered in the Daily Post’s Weekly Photo Challenges: “Tiny“, “H2O“, “Details“, “Abstract“, “Weight(less)“, “Careful“, “Close Up“, “Muse“, “Motion” and “Ephemeral“)

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Splash

Water rain drop

Water rain drop

Once, during some rain, I went outside, hoping to capture the perfect shot of falling raindrops. After several experimental/practice shots, I hit the jackpot using a high shutter speed and flash.

The rain splashes, though beautiful, are very short lived. They last no longer than a few milliseconds, and, without luck and the right equipment, they would be lost forever, never to be marvelled at by us.

(Entered in the Daily Post’s Weekly Photo Challenges: “H2O“, “Time“, “Monochromatic“, “Close Up“, “Muse“, “Ephemeral“)