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Wingspan

Photograph of a bird in flight

Photograph of a bird in flight

Sultanpur National Park, a small nature reserve in the northern part of India, is an excellent place to observe several different species of local and migratory birds.

Painted Storks such as this one are one of the largest bird species found in the park. They can have wingspans as wide as five feet and can weigh up to 3.5 kilograms. Their bright orange heads and beaks make them easy to spot. While many storks are migratory, this particular species isn’t. Painted storks are mostly found in marshy wetlands across South Asia, and also in some places in Eastern Asia.

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Spotted Deer

Photograph of Spotted Deer

Photograph of Spotted Deer

This photograph was taken in Jim Corbett National Park in the foothills of the Himalayas. Spotted deer, such as the one in this photograph, are easily one of the most abundantly occurring animal species in the park. I, in my one and only trip to the Park, must have seen more than fifty of the small deer. These deer are regularly hunted and eaten by the tigers for which the Park is well known.

Despite being a spectacle themselves, deer are rarely the reason travellers visit Corbett. The main attraction, of course, is the tigers. In fact, this photograph was taken on the way to one of the prime tiger-spotting areas of the park.

In this photograph, the deer is standing in front of an electric fence. Park officials have installed these artificial boundaries in selected areas of the park to prevent animals from straying into nearby villages, and to create enclosures where tourists can rest and take breaks.

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Perched

Photograph of a White Bird

Photograph of a White Bird

A real scarcity of food had hit the small family of birds living in the hollow of an old tree. The regulars of the birds, including worms, flies, honeybees and dragonflies, had all been wiped out by the intense cold. Even the tree in which they lived, which normally retained a small amount of leaves during the winter, had lost all of its leaves and life. Times were truly difficult. The youngest and most active member of the family Jim had an idea to find food. His plan was to find a high vantage point and look for any signs of movement from there. He searched for quite a while for the perfect location before it struck him – the perfect point had been right above him all along. The tree in which his family and he lived was a good twenty-five meters tall – easily high enough to scan the neighbouring areas from. He flew up and perched himself on a firm branch. For the next few hours Jim observed and reported any sign of potential food to his brother down in the hollow, who would go investigate and fetch the food if there was any. Through this plan the family found ample food to survive through the winter and live to see another beautiful spring. 

This photograph was taken in the world famous Jim Corbett National Park. Known primarily for its plentiful tigers, the park actually has a lot else to offer. Spotted-deer, sambar-deer, eagles, vultures, jackals, bears and alligators can all be seen in this prime example of unaltered nature. 

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Hiding Pigeon

Picture of Pigeons

Picture of Pigeons

In this photograph, the pigeon in front appears to have three wings because of the perfect placement of the other pigeon behind it. At the moment when this photograph was taken, the two pigeons actually seemed to be fighting (or dancing). The edges of the wings appear slightly blurry because the pigeons were flapping them violently during their fight (or dance). The motion of the wings led them to appear blurry in the photograph.

(Entered in the Daily Post’s Weekly Photo Challenge “Motion“.)

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Treat

Honeybee on Flower

Honeybee on Flower

Unable to find nectar in the concrete city, the honeybee tiredly arrived to an eleventh floor balcony. It had almost completely given up hope. When it first saw the beautiful purple flower, it did not believe its compound eyes. Only when the scent came wafting down did the bee truly realize that its search had been successful. It buzzed over to the flower and prepared itself for the imminent burst of juicy nectar. It had been rewarded for its hard work and tireless searching.

In today’s concrete world, it must be very difficult for honeybees and other insects to find nectar. The flower in the picture, one of many growing on my balcony, provides quite a sanctuary for all kinds of insects. Even though it is way up on the eleventh floor, insects seem to have no trouble in finding their way to it.

Spring sees the world emerge from the cocoon it had wrapped itself in to protect itself from the winter. Colourful flowers bloom everywhere, trees become laden with greenery, and insects, birds and all sorts of other animals come out to enjoy the beautiful days.

(Entered in the Daily Post’s Weekly Photo Challenges: “Details“, “Pure“, “Seasons“, “Vibrant“, “Treat“, “Close Up“, “Vivid” and “Reward“)

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Flock

Flock of Pigeons

Flock of Pigeons

Where I live, flocks of pigeons orbiting around buildings is a common sight. My building, which is one of the oldest buildings in the area, seems to be of particular attraction to the pigeons. Except the wee hours of morning, pigeons can be spotted at almost any time of day. The flurry of activity certainly intensifies at dawn and dusk, when the pigeons seem to be in some kind of hurry.

In this particular photograph, taken at dawn, a large flock of pigeons flies past the building neighbouring mine. The photograph relates to the theme “Early Bird” both symbolically (the photograph was taken early in the morning) and literally (the photograph contains ‘early’ birds).

(Submitted to the Daily Post’s Weekly Photo Challenges: ”
Morning” and “Early Bird“.)