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Wingspan

Photograph of a bird in flight

Photograph of a bird in flight

Sultanpur National Park, a small nature reserve in the northern part of India, is an excellent place to observe several different species of local and migratory birds.

Painted Storks such as this one are one of the largest bird species found in the park. They can have wingspans as wide as five feet and can weigh up to 3.5 kilograms. Their bright orange heads and beaks make them easy to spot. While many storks are migratory, this particular species isn’t. Painted storks are mostly found in marshy wetlands across South Asia, and also in some places in Eastern Asia.

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Pigeon

Photograph of Pigeon

Photograph of Pigeon

The population of pigeons in my city has grown exponentially in the past decade or so. All day, every day, hundreds of the grey birds can be seen. They are usually either flying around in groups or standing seemingly aimlessly on roads, ledges, windowsills or whatever else they find. In recent years, the pigeons have spent a lot of time in close proximity with humans, and they have therefore grown bolder. They are now more difficult to shoo away, and have become pests in many areas with their croaking and tendency to leave a trail of unsightly green-and-white masses behind them.

In this photograph, a pigeon is standing on the ledge of my balcony and stretching. While doing so, the normally unobserved pattern of the pigeon’s wing comes into view.

(Submitted to the Daily Post’s Weekly Photo Challenge: “Earth“)

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Spotted Deer

Photograph of Spotted Deer

Photograph of Spotted Deer

This photograph was taken in Jim Corbett National Park in the foothills of the Himalayas. Spotted deer, such as the one in this photograph, are easily one of the most abundantly occurring animal species in the park. I, in my one and only trip to the Park, must have seen more than fifty of the small deer. These deer are regularly hunted and eaten by the tigers for which the Park is well known.

Despite being a spectacle themselves, deer are rarely the reason travellers visit Corbett. The main attraction, of course, is the tigers. In fact, this photograph was taken on the way to one of the prime tiger-spotting areas of the park.

In this photograph, the deer is standing in front of an electric fence. Park officials have installed these artificial boundaries in selected areas of the park to prevent animals from straying into nearby villages, and to create enclosures where tourists can rest and take breaks.

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Perched

Photograph of a White Bird

Photograph of a White Bird

A real scarcity of food had hit the small family of birds living in the hollow of an old tree. The regulars of the birds, including worms, flies, honeybees and dragonflies, had all been wiped out by the intense cold. Even the tree in which they lived, which normally retained a small amount of leaves during the winter, had lost all of its leaves and life. Times were truly difficult. The youngest and most active member of the family Jim had an idea to find food. His plan was to find a high vantage point and look for any signs of movement from there. He searched for quite a while for the perfect location before it struck him – the perfect point had been right above him all along. The tree in which his family and he lived was a good twenty-five meters tall – easily high enough to scan the neighbouring areas from. He flew up and perched himself on a firm branch. For the next few hours Jim observed and reported any sign of potential food to his brother down in the hollow, who would go investigate and fetch the food if there was any. Through this plan the family found ample food to survive through the winter and live to see another beautiful spring. 

This photograph was taken in the world famous Jim Corbett National Park. Known primarily for its plentiful tigers, the park actually has a lot else to offer. Spotted-deer, sambar-deer, eagles, vultures, jackals, bears and alligators can all be seen in this prime example of unaltered nature. 

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Hiding Pigeon

Picture of Pigeons

Picture of Pigeons

In this photograph, the pigeon in front appears to have three wings because of the perfect placement of the other pigeon behind it. At the moment when this photograph was taken, the two pigeons actually seemed to be fighting (or dancing). The edges of the wings appear slightly blurry because the pigeons were flapping them violently during their fight (or dance). The motion of the wings led them to appear blurry in the photograph.

(Entered in the Daily Post’s Weekly Photo Challenge “Motion“.)