Image

Salzburg Cathedral

Photograph of Salzburg Cathedral

Photograph of Salzburg Cathedral

Salzburg’s old town is listed as a UNESCO World Heritage Site for its eventful history and incredible architecture. One of the structures that stands out is Salzburg Cathedral. Its huge dome, pictured here, is visible from much of the old town, and has become one of Salzburg’s most well-known symbols. The Cathedral, and the town of Salzburg in general, has become one of Europe’s top tourist destinations in the past few decades. Although many tourists visit Salzburg solely due to its connections to the Sound of Music and/or Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart, its architectural beauty deserves recognition and acclaim in itself.

(Submitted to the Daily Post’s Weekly Photo Challenges: “Wanderlust“, “Curve” and “Pure“)

Advertisements
Image

Neuschwanstein Castle

Neuschwanstein Castle

Neuschwanstein Castle

Neuschwanstein Castle is a nineteenth-century castle built on a hill overlooking a small village in south-west Bavaria, around a hundred kilometres from Munich. Originally built by Ludwig II of Bavaria as a retreat and homage to the composer Richard Wagner, the castle has now become a popular tourist attraction.

Perhaps an important factor in the castle’s popularity amongst tourists is the fact that the Disney Castle is supposed to be modelled on it. Similarities certainly exist. In particular, the conical towers that are eminent in this image of Neuschwanstein Castle are also features of the Disney Castle. Whether the Disney Castle was modelled on this castle or not, there is no denying that the claim has sparked some much deserved and merited interest in this architectural marvel.

Image

Railing

Photograph of a Railing

Photograph of a Railing

From politics to religion and from sports to one’s personal life, boundaries are everywhere. Humans seem to have this innate desire to segregate, to divide. We feel comfortable only when things are packed away neatly into distinctly classified boxes and when there is no ambiguity in matters.

While most boundaries are of the divisive sort, some actually do humanity good. Railings and fences, for example, while generally ordinary and boring, serve very noble purposes. They prevent people from falling off or out of things. This may seem menial, but such railings and fences have undoubtedly saved hundreds of lives.

The beautiful curved and ornate railing in the photograph above overlooks and protects a steep staircase inside the main building of Hellbrunn Palace in Salzburg, Austria.

Image

From Every Angle

Fountain Photograph

In every photograph, there are certain parts of the subject that are not visible. That is obvious, as each photograph can only be taken from one position. Whatever cannot be seen from that particular position will be absent from the photograph. To capture these omitted things, the photographer needs to change his point-of-view. Shots from different angles help photographers capture different aspects of the subject.

In the gallery below, there are pairs of photographs of different subjects taken from different angles. The photographs, though of the same thing, have aspects that make each one unique.

(Entered in the Daily Post’s Weekly Photo Challenges: “Partners“, “From Every Angle“.)

Gallery

Hallstatt

Hallstatt in Austria is a village that features on lists such as “Europe’s most beautiful villages”, and it’s not difficult to see why. Nestled within the Austrian Alps near Salzburg, Hallstatt has all the ingredients of a picture postcard village: it is small, with only around 1000 permanent inhabitants; it it located on the border of a lake; it is surrounded by hills in every direction; it has a small-town atmosphere, where everyone seems to know each other.

While travelling in Austria, we decided to visit Hallstatt on the way from Vienna to Salzburg. It turned out to be a wonderful decision, as the day was spent very well. Setting out from Vienna in the morning, we first stopped at the UNESCO World Heritage Site of Melk Abbey. The huge monastery in the tiny village of Melk is one of Austria’s architectural jewels. After that we headed for Hallstatt, but inevitably got lost in the mountainous roads. We stumbled upon some very picturesque spots: beautiful secluded lakes with crystal-clear water with mountains rising in the backdrop. In the afternoon we arrived in Hallstatt. With almost no urban influence, the town retains much of its charm and quiet. Wandering the paths along the lake and exploring the colourfully decorated houses took up the next few hours of our time. In the evening we departed from Hallstatt and headed to Salzburg, but not before taking one last spectacular photograph of the parking lot where our car was parked! See photographs from the day below.

(Entered in the Daily Post’s Weekly Photo Challenges: ”
Ambience“, “Today Was a Good Day“)

Lamp Post

Photograph of Lamp Post

Photograph of Lamp Post

There is really no reason to carve a lamp post. It would probably not make any difference to anyone’s life if the lamp post were not carved, or if it were carved any differently. However, the fact that the lamp post is carved subtly adds to the atmosphere and character of the place. Small things like the lamp post won’t be given much attention, but if they are missing or unattractive, they ruin the whole experience.

This photograph was taken at Schönbrunn Palace in Vienna, Austria. Everything at the Palace has a grand feel to it, and even the lamp posts aren’t exempt from this. Though the candles have been replaced by light bulbs, the outer structure of the lamp post is probably similar to what it was when the Palace was built.

Image

Arched Doorways

Photograph of an arched door at the Taj Mahal.

Photograph of an arched door at the Taj Mahal.

One of the most common features of Mughal architecture is the presence of large doorways or arches, normally intricately carved. At the Taj Mahal, one of the finest examples of Mughal architecture in the world, this feature is very prominent. On each side of the four-sided main building, there are large arched doorways. In this photograph, showing the front-facing side of the Taj Mahal, one central arch flanked by four small ones can be seen. It is difficult not to admire the magnificence and beauty of this architectural marvel.

(Submitted to the Daily Post’s Weekly Photo Challenges: “Inspiration” and “Door“)